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100 Word Challenge (this one has a ring of truth to it..)


"Now children," began Mrs Jobs, smiling, "today we have a very special visitor. His name is PC Harvester and he's going to talk to you about car safety."

“Reme...” As she spoke, the door opened and PC Harvester walked in.

"Good afternoon, children." exclaimed PC Harvester. "I have a question. Does anybody’s Mummy or Daddy drive quickly?"
Hands shot up and a voice from the back squeaked,

"My daddy drives fast, he has a Ferarri."

"Golly," said PC Harvester, "and does your Daddy wear his seatbelt?"

"Only when the bas***d coppers are around."

...out of the mouths of babes...

Comments

  1. Brilliant! That really is priceless & so well written I suspect you might have been in the classroom at the time!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Oh I can really imagine this happening for real! Thanks for the smile!

    ReplyDelete
  3. oopps, this is a cracker :) Made me laugh; can imagine the faces on the adults in the room ;)

    ReplyDelete

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